Peter Lyu | June 16, 2015

In fluid flow simulations, it is often important to evaluate the forces that the fluid exerts onto the body — for example, lift and drag forces on an airfoil or a car. Engineers can use these body forces to quantify the efficiency and aerodynamic performance of designs. Today, we will discuss different ways to compute lift and drag in COMSOL Multiphysics.

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Bridget Cunningham | April 27, 2015

Over the years, the development of sensor technology has enabled more accurate measurements of fluid flow. One such device is the thermal flow sensor. This instrument is valued for its simple design and implementation as well as its high degree of accuracy. Using COMSOL Multiphysics, a team of researchers from the University of Cambridge designed a 3D model to analyze the dynamics of a thermal flow sensor, a component of a flow meter.

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Fabrice Schlegel | April 7, 2015

Today, we compare the Boussinesq approximation to the full Navier-Stokes equations for a natural convection problem. We also show you how to implement the Boussinesq approximation in COMSOL Multiphysics software and discuss potential benefits of doing so.

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Brianne Costa | April 3, 2015

As the burning of fossil fuels becomes a more pressing issue, manufacturers are introducing more fuel efficient cars to the market. One main contributor to fuel burn is the car’s aerodynamic drag. Complexly shaped, cars are very challenging to model and it’s difficult to quantify the aerodynamic drag computationally. The Ahmed body is a benchmark model widely used in the automotive industry for validating simulation tools. The Ahmed body shape is simple enough to model, while maintaining car-like geometry features.

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Bridget Cunningham | April 2, 2015

In this blog post, we investigate syngas combustion in a round-jet burner using the Reacting Flow interface and the Heat Transfer in Solids interface. The results from this benchmark model are compared to experimental findings.

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Brianne Costa | March 24, 2015

Try pouring some wine into a glass. Don’t drink it yet — this is a scientific experiment. When you hold up your glass, you’ll see what look like teardrops running down the sides. These tears of wine are caused by the Marangoni effect, which describes a mass transfer along the surface of two fluid phases caused by surface tension gradients along the interface between the two phases (for example liquid and vapor).

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Fabrice Schlegel | January 30, 2015

Journal bearings are lubricated components that support a rotating shaft. Cavitation affects the performance of these bearings and must be considered during the design stage. Here, I’ll explain what journal bearings are and why predicting cavitation is important, as well as share an industry example with you.

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Fabrice Schlegel | January 27, 2015

If you are interested in using COMSOL Multiphysics software to solve multiphase flow problems, you may be wondering which multiphase flow interface to choose. This is your guide to the six interface options available to you and when you should use them.

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Bjorn Sjodin | January 23, 2015

How can you use an electric field to control the movement of electrically neutral particles? This may sound impossible, but in this blog entry, we will see that the phenomenon of dielectrophoresis (DEP) can do the trick. We will learn how DEP can be applied to particle separation and demonstrate a very easy-to-use biomedical simulation app that is created with the Application Builder and run with COMSOL Serverâ„¢.

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Fanny Littmarck | November 10, 2014

Worried about bacteria in your tomatoes? Research presented at the COMSOL Conference 2014 Boston shows where bacteria seeps through during hydrocooling — and how we can avoid ingesting it.

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Fabrice Schlegel | September 26, 2014

There are two aspects of home brewing: the culinary side and the engineering one. Many beer lovers start brewing either to improve a recipe, try to clone their favorite beer, or even simply just to see how it works. After brewing a few batches, however, it turns out that the brewing process can also be very challenging from an engineering point of view.

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