Structural Mechanics

Alexandra Foley | June 25, 2014

Wind turbine noise is a (hotly disputed) topic that we’ve mentioned on the blog before. While research into noise production by wind farms is still being debated among researchers, one way we’ve found to overcome these noisy turbine troubles is to place turbines offshore where they can’t be heard and, conveniently, high winds with more regularity make energy production more effective. However, a question that comes to mind is: What impact do offshore wind farms have on marine life?

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Laura Bowen | June 11, 2014

With all of the other components of an automobile to consider, it is easy for drivers to forget to routinely check tire pressure. Thankfully, companies are actually beginning to assemble most of their newer vehicles with built-in tire pressure monitoring sensors. These devices are placed at the bottom of the tire hub and measure air pressure automatically — all while the car is still in motion.

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Pawan Soami | June 6, 2014

How well you can strike a golf ball is not only determined by your muscle strength, but more importantly — it is influenced by several other factors involved in the mechanics of your golf swing. Let’s see how a multibody analysis of a golf swing can be used to improve the outcome of your stroke.

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Fabio Bocchi | June 5, 2014

Today, we will introduce the concept of residual stresses in structural mechanics and find out how to compute them by taking the example of a deep metal drawing process. First, we will explain how they can be computed and interpreted in a bending beam example with or without work hardening. Then, we will introduce a sheet metal forming model.

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Peng-Chhay Ung | May 28, 2014

In a previous blog post, we presented the applications of conjugate heat transfer involving immobile solids. The case of immobile solids simplifies the heat equation to be solved and is often a good approximation to the temperature field. Today, we will complete the description of the physics that account for thermoelastic effects of the material when heat transfer and solid mechanics are coupled.

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Fanny Littmarck | May 12, 2014

We have made a video tutorial for those of you who want to learn how to model stresses and strains in COMSOL Multiphysics. In under five minutes, we walk you through the modeling steps from setting up parameters and geometry to postprocessing the results. For simplicity’s sake, we use a wrench and bolt model to demo the concept.

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Walter Frei | April 9, 2014

In a previous posting, we looked at computing and controlling the volume of a cavity filled with an incompressible fluid, which solved for the static deformation of a fluid-filled rubber seal. In that example, we did not explicitly model the fluid, but added an equation to solve for the pressure, assuming incompressibility of the fluid. Here, we will extend this approach and include the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid in the deforming container.

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Supratik Datta | April 4, 2014

Previously, you saw how to compute stiffness of linear elastic structures in 0D and 1D. Today, we will expand on that and show you how to model this in 2D and 3D. We will also show you an alternate method to compute stiffness.

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Supratik Datta | April 3, 2014

Today, we will introduce the concept of structural stiffness and find out how we can compute the stiffness of a linear elastic structure subjected only to mechanical loading. In particular, we will explore how it can be computed and interpreted in different modeling space dimensions (0D and 1D) and what factors affect the stiffness of a structure.

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Alexandra Foley | March 17, 2014

When modeling computationally taxing geometries, you can save time by using cyclic symmetry to cut down on memory usage. This can be more complex for rotationally than axially symmetric geometries. However, with the Structural Mechanics Module you can easily solve a single section of an impeller model and still get accurate results.

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Henrik Sönnerlind | March 7, 2014

Buckling instability is a treacherous phenomenon in structural engineering, where a small increase in the load can lead to a sudden catastrophic failure. In this blog post, we will investigate some classes of buckling problems and how they can be analyzed.

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